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Case Studies:

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Case Studies

As a global human resource consulting firm, we have helped hundreds of organizations, both large and small, solve their unique HR challenges. Below are some brief examples of our past work:

Employee Retention Case Studies:

Study 1

Problem

For a service-oriented organization like T.G.I Friday’s, a competitive labor market puts a premium on creating jobs that are attractive to prospective employees and devising ways to keep new employees longer once they are hired. Not only does attracting or retaining capable, trained, and motivated employees directly affects the ability to serve the customer, it also affects bottom-line profitability. In response to T.G.I. Friday’s concerns about the ability to attract and retain quality hourly store-level employees, several specific opportunities were addressed.

Solution

Identified the cost of turnover at the store level and how it relates to key business metrics, determined the factors that contribute to reducing turnover at the store level, and identified management practices that can be implemented to positively impact hourly turnover and improve retention at the store level.

Study 2

Problem

The supermarket industry faces a critical need to find and keep good employees to properly serve its customers. Labor shortages are particularly painful to retailers who built stores or high-skill departments, like pharmacies, then found they could not open them because of staff shortages. It is clear that the industry must begin to compete as aggressively for employees as it does for customers. The problem is that most retailers do not know what their turnover costs really are, nor do they have the tools in place to control turnover. In this situation, retaining employees can be an extremely effective way to control the costs of turnover and minimize recruiting needs. Thus, the more employees retained, the lower the company’s turnover costs, reducing the need to recruit, hire, and train new employees.

Solution

Measured turnover costs at the store level and create a simplified method to quickly estimate turnover costs at the store level for any store–level job and identified management actions that will increase employee retention, thus reducing turnover.

Findings

The annual cost of employee turnover in the supermarket industry exceeds the entire industry’s profit by more than 40%. (Turnover costs = $5.8 billion versus industry profit of $4.1 billion). Turnover costs the typical supermarket $189,977 annually. Retention drivers were identified for both hourly and management employees. Top drivers for hourly employees included practices related to providing direction, supplying tools and equipment and supervisory behaviors. Top management drivers identified practices related to organizational direction, training and job advancement.

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Employee Training Case Studies:

Study 1

Problem

Major hospitality firm wanted to revamp its current approach to service training to reflect a more hands-on approach for meeting and exceeding customer expectations.

Solution

A certification system was developed and implemented which enabled service employees to certify in five service areas. Follow-up research documented positive correlation between employee certification and improved check average, covers, pool shares, customer satisfaction, and employee turnover.

Study 2

Problem

Major restaurant organization experiencing rapid growth was dissatisfied with their ablity to quickly and effectively prepare entry level managers for food production and front of the house roles leading to the position of restaurant manager.

Solution

A competency based program utilizing a self-directed methodology was created. Training time was reduced from 16 weeks for each role to an average of 8 weeks. Additionally, the programs allowed the organization to increase the number of qualified candidates needed to fill all positions.

Study 3

Problem

A large multi-unit firm received sub-par customer ratings for its receptionist function. Analysis revealed the existing employee training program did not reflect the current job competencies nor did it reflect new customer expectation standards.

Solution

A learning system was designed to reflect the work environment of the receptionist position. System components included audio models of desired customer service skills, self-paced material including learning guide for the development of each competency, job aids, and a resource for constructing a customized desk reference.

Study 4

Problem

A major hotel chain wanted to reduce the amount of time required to prepare entry level managers for key functional areas within the hotel.

Solution

A self-directed competency based learning system was designed for seven departmental areas. In addition to reducing training time from six months to two months and developing entry level competence for new employees, a framework was created to cross train employees across the seven departments and increase career advancement opportunities.

Study 5

Problem

A fortune 500 organization wanted to reposition itself from an "operations" driven management approach to a market driven strategy. The move called for an 180 degree shift in the way its managers and salespeople performed their jobs.

Solution

Job analyses identified competencies for sales positions. Learning systems leading to certification were developed. Five hundred salespeople and two hundred managers gained certification. The firm moved from a negative to a positive net revenue posture in 12 months after implementation.

Study 6

Problem

The Catering division for an international airline partnered with a smaller domestic airline in hopes of gaining access to markets in the Middle East. The initial commitment called for building five catering facilities and training nationals to operate each facility within Saudi Arabia. The international airline committed to the project without having a training system in place. Access to all construction contracts was contingent on training national for all management positions.

Solution

A competency based self-directed training program and support documents were developed. Twenty candidates were trained in four months at five European sites. The international airline was awarded all contracts and gained a partner in the Middle East.

Study 7

Problem

A large service management organization recognized the need to improve the skills of its field trainers to insure a newly created structured on –the-job training systems was implemented effectively. Although the trainers were experts in their jobs, they were never formally trained to conduct classroom or field based training.

Solution

The coaches clinic was designed to create professionalism within the field trainer group. Three performance improvement strategies were implemented: advanced coaching skills were taught, performance based certification criteria were identified and applied, and symbols of recognition were awarded. Two hundred trainers were certified.

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